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Eclipse’s Path Is Also Leaving a Trail of High Hotel Prices

The solar eclipse that will cast a visible shadow across the United States on Monday is already leaving an obvious mark on hotel prices.

The Super 8 hotel chain is considered an inexpensive option for travelers, and it has over 1,400 American locations. About 300 of those are within the path of totality, and 100 of those were sold out for Sunday or Monday, according to the Super 8 website.

Roughly 45 percent of Super 8s within 25 miles of the center path of totality that still had vacancies were listing rooms for at least double their usual price. One Super 8 in Grayville, Ill., advertised $949 a night for a Sunday-Tuesday stay. Its normal advertised nightly rate is $95.

A representative from Wyndham Hotels & Resorts, the parent company of Super 8, said each Super 8 is an individually operated franchise that sets its own rates. However, all franchise owners have access to the same revenue management software that they can use to set pricing strategy.

More expensive hotels in large cities are also seeing a spike. The Ritz-Carlton in Dallas is currently listing a two-night stay at $7,600 for Sunday-Tuesday. One week later, the price for a two-night stay will be $1,329.

Data for the map was created by comparing the lowest nonmember price for a stay April 7-9 with the same Sunday-Tuesday period one week before and one week after.

Even Super 8 hotels in Glendale, Ariz., the site of the men’s N.C.A.A. basketball tournament final, which takes place Monday, do not exceed eclipse prices. Multiple Super 8 locations near Augusta, Ga., home of the Masters golf tournament starting next week, are either sold out or have prices far above their average — explaining the map dots near the Augusta area.

Thelma Diller, who works at the Super 8 in Malvern, Ark., said she would be at the hotel Monday and would “hopefully” watch the eclipse. She said the hotel sold out almost a year ago. “I’ve worked here almost 20 years,” she said. “It’s extremely rare.”


Additional production by Aatish Bhatia

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